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    Standards 2017 Cochairs Share Their Can’t-Miss Sessions at ILA 2018 (Continued)

    By Alina O'Donnell
     | Jun 22, 2018

    Standards-Related Sessions ContinuedSeveral sessions at the ILA 2018 Conference, taking place in Austin, TX, July 20–23, tie to Standards 2017 in terms of its topics or roles. In this three-part blog series, Standards 2017 project cochairs Rita M. Bean, University of Pittsburgh, PA, and Diane E. Kern, University of Rhode Island, identify sessions you don’t want to miss:

    Add these Saturday offerings to your schedule*:

    • Meet the Standards 2017 Lead Writers for a Q & A: At this presentation, members of the revision committee will provide an overview of Standards 2017, explain how the revision effort was conducted, highlight important new changes, and answer questions.
    • Conversations From the Field on Impact of Literacy Learning: In a generative panel discussion format, literacy leaders (principals, coaches, teachers, and teacher educators) will address the roles of Foundational Knowledge and Curriculum and Instruction (Standards 2017 topics) in building teacher writing capacity and positively impacting student outcomes.
    • ILA 2017 Standards: Preparing Effective Classroom Literacy Teachers: Presenters (Standards 2017 cochairs and members of the writing team) will discuss the new standards and their potential for influencing teacher preparation. Participants will have an opportunity to interact with presenters.
    • Bridging Theory and Practice Through Service Learning in an Early Literacy Classroom: This session will walk the audience through a semester-long journey of literacy tutoring in an urban public school by students taking early literacy teaching methods course. The students kept blogs to reflect on their teaching and learning, which will guide a discussion around Professional Learning and Leadership (a Standards 2017 topic).
    • Disturbing the Universe: Creating a New Normal in the High School English Classroom: Led by a high school classroom teacher (a Standards 2017 role), this session will explore a different model of English class, a model centered on authentic engagement of all students. Attendees will leave energized with activities, student-centered reading and writing structures, and book ideas to help align their Curriculum and Instruction (a Standards 2017 topic) with their individual students or with the classroom community.
    • Virtual Literacy Coaching: Tools and Possibilities: Designed for literacy coaches (a Standards 2017 role), this session will explore Practicum/Clinical Experiences (a Standards 2017 topic) for candidates, including ideas about virtual literacy coaching with technology and digital tools. Participants will explore how to invite coaches into a coaching partnership, give lesson feedback through video tools and interactive documents, create coaching tool kits, and provide personalized professional development to teachers. Attendees should bring a mobile device and plan to engage with multiple digital tools that can enhance their literacy coaching.
    • ILA Certificate of Distinction for Literacy Professional Preparation: The ILA Certificate of Distinction (CoD) is awarded to undergraduate and graduate programs that meet specific levels of excellence tied to Standards 2017. The initial focus will be on programs preparing reading/literacy specialists. After an overview of the application and review process, there will be opportunities for Q & A.
    • Teaching Speaking: Developing the Most Important Language Art: Merging Foundational Knowledge and Curriculum and Instruction (Standards 2017 topics), this session will deliver a practical, multiple-trait framework for understanding and teaching the skills involved in oral communication. Attendees will leave with effective lessons, activities, and rubrics.

    Don’t miss Bean and Kern’s workshop, ILA/CAEP Reading/Literacy Specialist Program Writers and Reviewers. Alongside researchers, teacher educators, and CAEP representatives, they’ll provide an overview of standards and the key changes; review model assessments, rubrics, and scoring guides; and share the most recent developments from CAEP. Attendees are encouraged to bring sample assessments and questions. Individual 30-minute consultations will be available.

    *Please note
    : Both Institute Day and the ILA/CAEP Workshop require an additional fee and are not included in the cost of registration for Core Conference.

    Standards for the Preparation of Literacy Professionals 2017 
    is available here.

    Alina O'Donnell is the communications strategist at ILA and the editor of Literacy Daily.

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    Standards 2017 Cochairs Share Their Can’t-Miss Sessions at ILA 2018

    By Alina O'Donnell
     | Jun 14, 2018
    Standards-related sessions

    Last month, ILA unveiled Standards for the Preparation of Literacy Professionals 2017 (Standards 2017), the first-ever set of national standards guiding the preparation of literacy professionals. Developed by literacy experts across the United States, Standards 2017 establishes criteria for literacy professional preparation programs across the country anddescribes what candidates for the literacy profession should know and be able to do in professional settings.

    Several sessions at the ILA 2018 Conference, taking place in Austin, TX, July 20–23, tie to Standards 2017 in terms of its topics or roles. In this three-part blog series, Standards 2017 project cochairs Rita M. Bean, University of Pittsburgh, PA, and Diane E. Kern, University of Rhode Island, identify sessions you don’t want to miss:

    Add these Friday offerings to your schedule*:

    Don’t miss Bean and Kern’s workshop, ILA/CAEP Reading/Literacy Specialist Program Writers and Reviewers. Alongside researchers, teacher educators, and CAEP representatives, they’ll provide an overview of standards and the key changes; review model assessments, rubrics, and scoring guides; and share the most recent developments from CAEP. Attendees are encouraged to bring sample assessments and questions. Individual 30-minute consultations will be available.

    *Please note: Both Institute Day and the ILA/CAEP Workshop require an additional fee and are not included in the cost of registration for Core Conference.

    Standards for the Preparation of Literacy Professionals 2017
    is available here.

    Alina O'Donnell is the communications strategist at ILA and the editor of Literacy Daily.

    Read More
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    Five Reasons You Should Attend Institute Day at ILA 2018

    By Alina O'Donnell
     | Jun 13, 2018

    Institute DayEach year, the ILA conference kicks off with a slate of preconference institutes. Available for one-day standalone registration or as an addition to Core Conference, Institute Day provides the perfect option for educators who want to take a deep dive into a specific topic of interest. With 10 unique offerings geared toward varying experience, roles, and levels, there’s truly something for everyone.

    Here are five things you’ll miss if you skip Institute Day at ILA 2018:

    Read more about available institutes in the iPlanner, and register here.

    Alina O’Donnell is the communications strategist at ILA and the editor of Literacy Daily.

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    ILA 2018 Research Institute: Our All-Keynote Format Is Back!

    By Maureen McLaughlin
     | Jun 06, 2018

    Research InstituteBack for its fifth year, the International Literacy Association (ILA) 2018 Research Institute is better than ever.

    Nationally renowned researchers, innovative topics, practical connections to teaching, and the return of our all-keynote format await participants on Institute Day at the ILA 2018 Conference, July 20, in Austin, TX. Organized by the Literacy Research Panel, research into practice is the foundation of the ILA 2018 Research Institute: Best Practices in the Teaching of Reading.

    This year’s topics range from early literacy to adolescent and disciplinary literacies, from student motivation and engagement to visible learning, and from STEM and the English language arts to the critical importance of small-group instruction.

    All presentations will contribute to participants’ deeper understanding of multiple facets of literacy and, in particular, to their knowledge of reading comprehension.

    Participants will have the unique opportunity to learn from and work with leading experts in the field. This year’s line-up of presenters includes Douglas Fisher, Nell Duke, John Guthrie, Jacy Ippolito, Evan Ortlieb, Ernest Morrell, Ray Reutzel, Denise Johnson, and P. David Pearson, who will deliver a special presentation titled “Literacy Research for Trying Times.”

    Bridging research, theory, and practice, the course is designed to encourage collaboration among researchers, educators, teacher educators, reading specialists, literacy coaches, special educators, and other literacy roles. Attendees will learn about the latest research findings and discuss how to translate those concepts into classroom pedagogy.

    The ILA 2018 Research Institute is one of 10 courses offered at Institute Day, an exciting way to kick off ILA’s annual conference. Please join us for what promises to be another focused, fast-tracked day of learning.

    Maureen McLaughlin is a past president of the International Reading Association (now the International Literacy Association) and a department chair and professor of reading education at East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania. She will present at the ILA 2018 Research Institute at the ILA 2018 Conference, July 20–23, in Austin, TX. Visit ilaconference.org to learn more and register.

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    Marley Dias on Inspiring Activism, Diversifying Children's Literature, and Her Latest Reads

    By Lara Deloza
     | May 31, 2018

    Marley DiasMarley Dias made headlines as a sixth grader when she initiated the #1000BlackGirlBooks project to collect and donate 1,000 titles that featured black girls as the central character. Marley's drive has since yielded more than 11,000. Her first book, Marley Dias Gets It Done: And So Can You!, was published by Scholastic the same month she turned 13.

    Why was it so important to you to bring awareness to a lack of diversity in children’s literature?

    “Bringing awareness to the lack of diversity in children’s literature is important to me because there were so many students who have never and will never see themselves reflected in literature assigned in schools. I want to stop the intentional exclusion of some people’s stories, and I want every child to have a place in literature where they can see themselves and learn about the experiences of others.”

    Do you consider yourself a changemaker, and if so, why?

    “I consider myself a changemaker because I am working toward changing the systems in schools so that students are able to see diverse main characters. I have been able to achieve this on a global scale and I will continue until every student can see themselves and diverse people as the main characters.”

    How does your book encourage tweens and teens to become changemakers?

    “My book tells my story and shows my path. I started when I was 10 years old. I am now 13 years old. If I can do it then anyone can. Marley Dias Gets It Done: And So Can You! encourages tweens and teens to become changemakers by giving real specific tips for them to make a change in their communities. Instead of just saying work hard or believe in yourself, this book puts all of that information into clear and achievable steps.”

    What can their adult teachers learn from reading it?

    “Teachers, like parents, can learn that they must listen to kids voices and support kids’ actions so that they can succeed. Teachers can learn that by offering diverse books they are reducing ignorance as well as helping children become more confident. Being informed and being more confident will help children succeed in and out of the classroom.”

    You are often referred to as an advocate for literacy. What’s next for you in that area?

    “I believe that literacy is important because it gives you the tools to express yourself and share your ideas. I want parents and kids to know that reading is fun; it is not just about doing well in school. It’s about being a thoughtful person who positively contributes to the world. To make sure that this idea grows, I am starting the Black Girl Book Club. The book clubs can happen in schools as well as in community spaces. I want kids—and adults—to get together and talk about books and share ideas.”

    How does literacy play into your social justice campaign for racial harmony?

    “I don’t usually define my work in terms of racial harmony. To me, my work is really about understanding. I want to make sure that people are taking the time to learn about others. I also want people to imagine black girls as leaders and accept that we can be and are the main characters of our lives. I know that if this understanding happens, racial harmony may be the outcome, but racial harmony is not the first thing I think about when I think about my work. Achieving equity and opening spaces for black girls and others to learn are the core reasons for my campaign.

    Also, sometimes I think when we say harmony it can make people feel like they are being forced to get along. My work is about education and acceptance. I want people to develop the patience and tolerance to know that there are other ways of being. They may not agree with those ways but they still need to make and hold space for other thoughts, ideas, and possibilities.”

    What are three books you’re super excited about right now (and why)?

    “The books I’m super excited about are Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi because it shows the world that in fantasy books, black people don't have to die first, or be the slapstick character, but can be leaders. Next, I’m excited about An Absolutely Remarkable Thing by Hank Green. It hasn’t come out yet, but Hank Green is my favorite YouTuber and now he has books, just like his brother, John Green. Last, I’m excited about Rebound by Kwame Alexander because he is one of my favorite authors telling stories about black boys.”

    Marley Dias will deliver the opening keynote at Children’s Literature Day at the ILA 2018 Conference, July 20–23, in Austin, TX. Learn more and register here.

    Lara Deloza is the senior communications manager at ILA.

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