Literacy Daily

Teaching With Tech
Professional Books Discount Program
Close Reading and Writing From Sources
Spring Catalog
Professional Books Discount Program
Close Reading and Writing From Sources
Spring Catalog
    • Digital Literacies
    • Teaching With Tech
    • Job Functions
    • Classroom Teacher
    • Literacy Coach
    • Literacy Education Student
    • Other/Literacy Champion
    • Teacher Educator
    • Tutor
    • Topics
    • Foundational Skills
    • 21st Century Skills
    • Speaking
    • Literacies
    • Digital Literacy
    • Teaching Strategies
    • Home-School Partnerships
    • Innovating With Technology
    • Nontraditional Learning Environments
    • Project-Based Learning

    Amplify Student Talk Through Video

    By Angie Johnson
     | May 12, 2017

    Amplify Student Talk Through VideoTeachers know from experience that quality student talk in a classroom improves depth of thinking and reflection. Organizations including the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD) and the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) encourage teachers to use the power of student talk through best practices like teacher–student conferencing, literature circles, Socratic seminars, and student-led parent–teacher conferences. Lately I’ve extended that power through two video tools that facilitate robust student-to-teacher and student-to-student exchanges:  Recap and Flipgrid.

    With Recap, students record videos up to two minutes long in response to assigned prompts. My eighth-grade students recently shared ideas for a poem in which they were to use personification or apostrophe. In their Recaps, they explained how they planned to incorporate the devices and why they chose them and then assessed their own understanding. A comment stream below the video allowed me to dialogue with students about their ideas and self-assessments. Finally, I compiled four responses into a “Daily Review Reel” to illustrate the various ways these literary devices might be used.

    Recap allows unlimited classes and students and is currently free. Pictured is a teacher view of a single set of responses; students see only their own responses, not their classmates’.

    teacher-sees-class-responses_w800

    With Flipgrid’s free version, teachers create prompts with text or video and students respond in up to 90-second videos. Flipgrid offers automatic transcription as an added feature but does not provide a self-assessment tool. Unlike Recap, students can view their classmates’ responses. With the Flipgrid upgrade, students can record responses to classmates’ videos and connect with other students around the world through the Global Connections page.

    Teachers can assess responses using a built-in performance rubric. The free version allows only one class but unlimited prompts and students, whereas the upgrade allows unlimited classes. I recently used the upgraded version of Flipgrid to hold a poetry slam. This removed performance pressure and upgraded the quality of final performances.

    memory-poem-idea-responses_w800

    What else can a teacher do with a tool like Recap or Flipgrid?  The list below includes some of the ways my students have interacted using these tools.  

    To build classroom community, students have...

    • Shared introductions
    • Introduced others (parents, siblings, grandparents, pets) to classmates
    • Shared places or favorite things with classmates
    • Shared personal stories

    In the writing process, students have...

    • Shared writing ideas
    • Discussed prewriting plans
    • Asked for targeted feedback on drafts
    • Shared final pieces and responded to others

    In the reading workshop, students have...

    • Recorded and shared book talks
    • Summarized assigned reading, jigsaw style
    • Performed oral interpretations of favorite poems
    • Posed questions about words, ideas, or concepts that confused them
    • Shared interpretations or analyses of assigned reading

    With group discussions students have...

    • Suggested essential questions to begin a Socratic seminar
    • Summarized the central takeaway of a discussion
    • Critiqued a discussion and offered suggestions for improvement

    There are other ways to combine apps for video sharing, but I find the seamless efficiency of programs like Recap and Flipgrid to be game-changers. Both provide apps for multiple platforms and are intuitive to use. Most important, they amplify student talk in new and exciting ways.

    Angie JohnsonAngie Johnson is a doctoral student in Educational Psychology and Educational Technology at Michigan State University. She teaches eighth-grade language arts and is a media and technology integration specialist at Lakeshore Middle School in Stevensville, MI.


    Read More
    • Classroom Teacher
    • Digital Literacies
    • Content Types
    • Job Functions
    • Teaching With Tech
    • 21st Century Skills
    • Foundational Skills
    • Topics
    • ~16 years old (Grade 11)
    • ~15 years old (Grade 10)
    • ~14 years old (Grade 9)
    • ~13 years old (Grade 8)
    • ~12 years old (Grade 7)
    • ~11 years old (Grade 6)
    • ~10 years old (Grade 5)
    • Student Level
    • Teacher Educator
    • Special Education Teacher
    • Reading Specialist
    • Literacy Education Student
    • Literacy Coach
    • Librarian
    • Blog Posts

    How to Engage English Learners With Technology

    By Aileen Hower
     | May 05, 2017

    Teach and Engage ELsOne question all teachers ask when they have an English Learner (EL) in their classroom is, What more can I be doing to help support this student?

    First and foremost, it is important to remember that learning a new language takes time. In our high-stakes testing environments, we hope to have ELs reading on grade-level as soon as possible. Yet, we must remind ourselves that learning a new language, especially when there may be gaps in a student’s education due to time away from school or curriculum differences, is a slow process; ELs deserve sufficient time to listen first. Along the way, there are many digital tools that support a variety of literacy learning goals.

    Communication: Speech-to-text tools like Google Translate and American Wordspeller & Phonetic Dictionary can help students convert their native languages into English. Likewise, if a student is confused about a concept, the teacher can translate the lesson into the student’s first language for easier comprehension. While these tools are not perfect, they can be used to relay simple or important messages.

    Listening, Vocabulary, and Comprehension: Reading aloud is essential, especially for entering, emerging, or developing listeners. There are many digital resources that include read-aloud features, including the following:

    • Scholastic’s Storia has a “read to me” feature for some of its e-books.
    • PebbleGo offers read-aloud audio and word-by-word highlighting.
    • Scholastic’s BookFlix pairs classic children’s storybooks in video format with nonfiction e-books. TrueFlix offers multimedia science and social studies readings for older readers (explore trial versions of both programs here).
    • Storyline Online features actors who creatively read books aloud.
    • One More Story offers Read-Along Mode for pre-readers and a supportive I Can Read It Mode for emergent readers who want to transition into independent readers.

    Another low-tech, but useful device is the television. ELs can turn on the closed captioning feature for a relaxing, enjoyable way to build listening skills.  

    For students who are ready to challenge their listening and speaking skills, the Speaky app provides an international language exchange community where users can practice language socially. Other popular language learning tools include Duolingo, which enables students to learn over 20 languages through gamification, and Voice Thread, a web-based application that helps students produce interactive, multimedia video conversations.  

    Most importantly, get to know your student(s) and his or her family, and celebrate their heritage and culture. The best strategy is to be patient as you find creative ways to engage all students, including ELs, in authentic literacy learning opportunities

    Aileen HowerAileen P. Hower, Ed.D. is the K12 Literacy/ESL Supervisor for the South Western School District in Pennsylvania. She also teaches graduate level reading courses for Cabrini University in Pennsylvania. In addition to teaching, she is Vice President of the Keystone State Reading Association (KSRA) and conference chair for the KSRA's 50th Annual Conference in Hershey, PA. You can find her on Twitter at @aileenhower or on her blog at aileenhower.wordpress.com.

    This article is part of a series from the International Literacy Association’s Technology in Literacy Education Special Interest Group (TILE-SIG).

    Read More
    • Classroom Teacher
    • Digital Literacies
    • Content Types
    • Blog Posts
    • Job Functions
    • Teacher Preparation
    • Research
    • Mentorship
    • Leadership
    • Professional Development
    • Digital Literacy
    • Literacies
    • Writing
    • Reading
    • 21st Century Skills
    • Foundational Skills
    • English Language Arts
    • Content Areas
    • School Policies
    • School Leadership
    • Administration
    • Topics
    • ~9 years old (Grade 4)
    • ~8 years old (Grade 3)
    • ~7 years old (Grade 2)
    • ~6 years old (Grade 1)
    • ~5 years old (Grade K)
    • ~4 years old (Grade Pre-K)
    • ~18 years old (Grade 12)
    • ~17 years old (Grade 12)
    • ~16 years old (Grade 11)
    • ~15 years old (Grade 10)
    • ~14 years old (Grade 9)
    • ~13 years old (Grade 8)
    • ~12 years old (Grade 7)
    • ~11 years old (Grade 6)
    • ~10 years old (Grade 5)
    • Student Level
    • Policymaker
    • Literacy Education Student
    • Literacy Coach
    • Teaching With Tech

    Digital Literacy Demands on Specialized Literacy Professionals

    By Vicky Zygouris-Coe
     | Apr 21, 2017

    TILE-04212018-w300Expectations about the knowledge and skilled use of digital literacies, texts, and technologies are integrated throughout the July 2016 draft of the International Literacy Association’s 2017 Standards for the Preparation of Literacy Professionals. This shift from the 2010 standards that focused much less on digital literacies reflects the changing definition of literacy in the 21st century.

    So, what types of knowledge and experiences do specialized literacy professionals need to meet students’, teachers’, and schools’ literacy needs in the 21st century? I examined and will share trends emerging from analysis of my state’s 2016–2017 K–12 reading plans. I analyzed the 32-page document from one of the top five largest school district’s plans with one purpose in mind: to identify this district’s plans to support students’ digital literacies. I present my findings below in two ways: (1) by presenting sample evidence of district support for digital literacies and (2) by raising questions about the role of specialized literacy professionals in this context.

    The following trends are representative of several school districts’ K–12 reading plans in my state.

    Sample School District K–12 Reading Plan

    Related Questions

    Literacy coaches, department chairs, and classroom teachers will analyze results from formative and summative assessments that also include embedded digital program assessments to track students’ progress toward mastery of standards.

    What knowledge do specialized literacy professionals and classroom teachers need to have to use an array of digital assessments to support students’ and teachers’ needs?

    The school district will leverage the power of technology by adopting a learning management system (LMS) to provide all educators access to data, content, resources, and expertise that promote inspiring teaching, improve student learning outcomes, and meet individual student needs.

    How can we weave a strong foundation for developing and supporting digital literacies through components of this learning management system?

    The LMS will be used as a key digital resource that supports a blended and personalized learning environment for teaching, learning, communication, and assessments that can be customized to all students’ needs.

    What knowledge do specialized literacy personnel need to design learning supports that use personalized tools and blended learning approaches?

    The LMS will support the district’s goal to move beyond the “textbook-driven classroom” core programs and provide teachers and students with access to extensive digital resources to build a bank of texts and materials beyond materials provided by the state-adopted materials for grades K–12.

    What do specialized reading professionals need to know and be able to do to support students’ literacy development in the context of digital texts, mediums, and contexts?

    The school district will provide professional development for teachers on how to (a) access, identify, and use a variety of complex digital and print texts that align with the curriculum and support students’ needs and (b) use digital tools and resources to leverage high-quality classroom instruction and appropriate interventions for all students.

    What do literacy interventions look like in the context of digital literacies?

    A component of an inviting and engaging literacy environment includes designated areas for (a) teachers to use digital tools and strategies to enhance instruction (e.g., interactive whiteboards, LCD projectors, document cameras, and student interactive respondents) and (b) students to use digital tools, e-books, computers, iPads, iPods, or MP3 players for accessing digital content and online resources.

    How can specialized literacy professionals help teachers, for example, learn how to support students’ reading of digital text and their development of online reading comprehension skills?

    The district’s Multitiered System of Supports (MTSS)/Response to Intervention (RTI) also includes using supplemental print and digital instructional and supplemental intervention resources.

    What knowledge do specialized literacy professionals need to have about how to use supplemental print and digital instructional and supplemental intervention resources?

    Classroom libraries with leveled text collections include both print and digital multimedia format resources in addition to the core reading program’s digital technology extensions.

    How can specialized literacy professionals collaborate with teachers and school librarians to select supplemental multimedia resources for teachers and their students?

    All students have ongoing access to texts in both print and digital formats.

    Having access to digital texts does not guarantee knowing how to read and comprehend them. What professional learning experiences would be useful to teachers?

    The school district’s core reading program also includes a suite of assessments to digital and print unit tests and unit writing projects that are used to monitor students’ reading gains on a quarterly basis.

    Taking a test online requires a different set of skills. What role should specialized literacy professionals play in this area?

    To become media literate, students must be able to analyze, synthesize, evaluate, and effectively communicate information across various mediums in print and digital formats.

    What knowledge and experiences do specialized literacy professionals need to be able to model for teachers effective practices for supporting students’ critical reading, writing, and thinking skills?

    School-based literacy coaches will also be responsible for managing school-wide print and digital collections and closely monitoring the access and utilization of these resources in teaching and learning throughout the school.

    What professional learning opportunities do literacy coaches need to have for them to provide school support in the area of management and progress monitoring of the school’s reading/literacy program?

    The literacies of the 21st century have brought about many shifts, including shifts in the revised standards for specialized literacy professionals. The field is ripe for new conversations and collaborations geared toward developing and supporting literacy professionals’, teachers’, and students’ literacies in a digital age.

    Vicky Zygouris-Coe is a professor of reading education at the University of Central Florida.

    This article is part of a series from the International Literacy Association’s Technology in Literacy Education Special Interest Group (TILE-SIG).

    Read More
    • Content Types
    • Blog Posts
    • Digital Literacies
    • Teaching With Tech
    • Job Functions
    • Classroom Teacher
    • Librarian
    • Literacy Coach
    • Reading Specialist
    • Special Education Teacher
    • Student Level
    • ~10 years old (Grade 5)
    • ~11 years old (Grade 6)
    • ~12 years old (Grade 7)
    • ~13 years old (Grade 8)
    • ~14 years old (Grade 9)
    • ~15 years old (Grade 10)
    • ~16 years old (Grade 11)
    • ~17 years old (Grade 12)
    • ~18 years old (Grade 12)
    • ~4 years old (Grade Pre-K)
    • ~5 years old (Grade K)
    • ~6 years old (Grade 1)
    • ~7 years old (Grade 2)
    • ~8 years old (Grade 3)
    • ~9 years old (Grade 4)
    • Topics
    • Content Areas
    • Science
    • Literacies
    • Content Area Literacy
    • Digital Literacy
    • Teaching Strategies
    • Innovating With Technology

    Casting a New Light on Podcasting

    By Mark J. Davis
     | Apr 14, 2017

    TILE_04142017_w300Richard Simmons was ubiquitous on television in the 1980s and 1990s. His Sweatin’ to the Oldies videos and weight-loss products sold millions. In the past decade, talk show hosts continued to welcome his exuberant and inexhaustible energy. Then, in 2013, he quietly disappeared from the limelight and chose to cut off communication with the public.

    Dan Taberski created the Missing Richard Simmons podcast chronicling the genuine stories of Richard’s positive impact on others and wondered what had become of the exercise guru. In March 2017, Taberski’s podcast reached the top of the Apple iTunes Store charts and ignited stories from mainstream news outlets. The power of the podcast was front-page news.

    The term podcast is often attributed to journalist Ben Hammerslay from 2004. The term is a made-up word combining “pod” which references newly introduced Apple iPods, and “broadcast” for the rise in online streaming radio. It is more likely that you have consumed media without ever realizing how the podcast changed our lives. In a digital landscape led by social media giants like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, there seems to be less attention paid to a passive technology introduced just over a decade ago. Yet we regularly stream music and binge watch an entire television series.

    In other words, the podcast helped usher in the era of on-demand media. 

    Podcasted radio shows are similar to audiobooks; an episodic podcast allows you to enjoy chapters that build on one another. Serial is one of the leading examples, whereby users follow a true-crime mystery that unfold over several weeks. Fan fiction with original storylines have gravitated towards podcasting. At AudioFictions, fans of the Harry Potter have created over 200 original stories based on the J.K. Rowling’s series.

    Video podcasts, sometimes called vodcasts, have become more prevalent as well. YouTube and Vimeo certainly owe their designs to podcasting. Consequently, this helped usher in more online education, whereby learners participate at his or her own pace. TED talks have allowed millions of viewers to watch brief presentations of innovative designs and fascinating stories. MIT OpenCourseware and The Open University feature access to recorded lectures with exceptional educational content.  Talks with Teachers, #edChat Radio, and The Marshall Memo give abbreviated educational research and instruction through weekly podcasts.

    Teachers are also embracing podcast creations in the classroom. In several English classrooms at Barrington High School in Rhode Island, Bryan Caswell and Molly MacIntosh have begun capturing students’ oral histories as podcasts. The format was inspired by National Public Radio’s The Moth Radio Hour program, during which regular people tell short stories about their lives. Students in this project were given a thematic question such as, “When did you realize that your perception had changed?” Based on critiques from peers, the best stories were recorded as a live performance before an audience of parents, students, and teachers.

    For the past three years, I have been working with literacy students who needed practice with writing and oral speaking. Using the Star Wars Radio plays, we remixed stories from the original trilogy and created an episodic podcast. Each episode includes students’ vocal performance along with music and sound effects. As we build more episodes, we hope to use a Creative Commons License to distribute them publicly.

    Podcasting is a remarkable medium that is certainly worthy of a second look. If you have an interest, do a simple search with the term “podcast” included. Chances are that a podcast exists for you. When you are ready to dive into podcast distribution, try using a host such as SoundCloud or PodBean to reach a wider audience.

    mdavis-headshot_w80Mark J. Davis is a high school reading specialist and a doctoral candidate at University of Rhode Island and Rhode Island College. He is passionate about digital literacy with a specific interest in infographics and information visualization. Visit his website at www.davisclassroom.com or follow him on Twitter @watermarkedu.

    This article is part of a series from the International Literacy Association’s Technology in Literacy Education Special Interest Group (TILE-SIG).

     

    Read More
    • Blog Posts
    • Teaching With Tech
    • Job Functions
    • Classroom Teacher
    • Digital Literacies
    • Digital Literacy
    • Literacies
    • Writing
    • Vocabulary
    • 21st Century Skills
    • Foundational Skills
    • English Language Arts
    • Content Areas
    • Topics
    • ~9 years old (Grade 4)
    • ~18 years old (Grade 12)
    • ~17 years old (Grade 12)
    • ~16 years old (Grade 11)
    • ~15 years old (Grade 10)
    • ~14 years old (Grade 9)
    • ~13 years old (Grade 8)
    • ~12 years old (Grade 7)
    • ~11 years old (Grade 6)
    • Student Level
    • Teacher Educator
    • Special Education Teacher
    • Reading Specialist
    • Literacy Education Student
    • Literacy Coach
    • Librarian
    • Content Types

    E-Writers: How Do They Influence Student Writing Motivation and Self-Efficacy?

    By Richard E. Ferdig, Kristine E. Pytash, Karl W. Kosko, and John Dunlosky
     | Apr 07, 2017

    04072017_TILE_w220E-writers, also known as digital writing tablets, are relatively simple devices that allow users to draw and write on varying size tablets. Less expensive versions are typically small and erase without saving, and more expensive models have larger displays and features like an ability to recall written images. E-writers have been touted for their ability to reduce paper waste and for their portability; however, little is known about how e-writers might influence students who are emerging writers. 

    To explore the value of e-writers for emerging writers, we worked in a local elementary school with students in preschool, kindergarten, and first grade. We conducted a six-week study to investigate how using e-writers might influence students’ self-efficacy and motivation. Using pre- and post-survey analysis, we measured students’ writing self-efficacy and motivation. Parents and teachers were also surveyed three times throughout the study to gather their perceptions.

    During the study, students had access to a Boogie Board Sync e-writer at school. Teachers used the e-writer when they saw opportunities in their instruction and kept a log of how they used the Boogie Boards. After four weeks of the study, we also gave all students a second Boogie Board to take home so we could explore the ways they wrote with the e-writer at home versus at school. At the end of the study, we collected all the writing done on the Boogie Boards. 

    We found evidence that e-writers can have a positive impact on students’ willingness to write and their perceptions of themselves as writers, as student data revealed significant growth in motivation and self-efficacy towards writing.

    With the significant amount of technology currently available, we were curious as to why this technology, which essentially only allows students to write directly on the screen, might have this impact. What we found, according to the parents and teachers, was that having writing as the sole feature of the tool might actually be one of the main reasons for its success. Instead of using a tool that allowed them to do a variety of activities, students were using the e-writers only to engage in emerging writing activities such as writing, drawing, scribbling, and spelling.

    In addition, parents and teachers noted that portability was important. Parents and teachers described various places (e.g. on the bus, during breaks, in the car, around the dinner table) where writing became part of their daily or family routine. Furthermore, parents and teachers reported that using the e-writer provided opportunities for students to collaboratively write with classmates and family.

    We tend to think of technology as being a powerful motivator; while it often is, we can’t forget that students need time to write to develop as writers. We appreciate the affordances of digital tools for writing; however, technology shouldn’t distract students from writing. Rather, it should be used to engage students in rich writing practices. 

    RickFerdig_w80Richard E. Ferdig is the Summit Professor of Learning Technologies and Professor of Instructional Technology at Kent State University.  


    KristinePytash_w80Kristine E. Pytash is an Associate Professor of Literacy Education at Kent State University.


    KarlKosko_w80Karl Kosko is an Assistant Professor of Math Education at Kent State University.


    JohnDunlosky_w85John Dunlosky is Professor of Psychology and Director of the SOLE Center at Kent State University. 


    This article is part of a series from the International Literacy Association’s 
    Technology in Literacy Education Special Interest Group (TILE-SIG).

    Read More
Back to Top

Categories

Recent Posts

Archives